Ep 44: Photojournalist Julia Rendleman

“I think we have seen the images of needles searching for veins and people in very sad circumstances, living on the streets or prostituting. Some call this ‘needle porn.’ I don’t have any pictures to add to that sort of reporting,”-Julia Rendleman, from her series ‘A Daily Fight For Control’ featured on  The Marshall Project

Julia Rendleman is a freelance photojournalist based in Richmond, Virginia. She has received two grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting – one for a video story about the effects global economics have on Jamaican farmers and another for a photo essay about Bhutanese refugees living in Nepal. In 2010, she was named a Getty Images Emerging Talent Photographer. That same year she received a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography for a story about a women’s prison in southern Illinois. Julia contributes to The Washington Post, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, New York Times Magazine, U.S. News & World Report, VICE and others. She is listed with other great photographers at Women Photograph.

Ep 42: Field Notes: The Kids are Alright

In our first Field Notes episode, we leave the studio and interview photojournalism seniors from the Baltimore School For The Arts who sat down for a candid talk about the future of the industry.

Ep 41: Vox’s Kainaz Amaria on #MeToo in Photojournalism

This Ep. continues to look a the #MeToo movement in photojournalism with Vox’s Kainaz Amaria.  Her piece can be read here.

As Vox Visuals Editor, Kainaz runs an interdisciplinary team specializing in graphics, interactives, photography, data and design. Previously, she was an editor on NPR’s Visual Team. Before all the desk jobs, she was a freelance photojournalist based in Mumbai, India. Her clients included The New York Times, Vogue India, and Reuters. Prior to that, she worked for the St. Petersburg Times in Florida. In 2010, she was a Fulbright Scholar and completed a short film on the Parsi Zoroastrian community in Mumbai.

Her images and multimedia collaborations have been recognized by contests including CPOY, Women in Photojournalism, Atlanta Photojournalism Conference, the National Press Photographers’ Contest and the South Asian Journalist Association. She was named a Chips Quinn Scholar in 2007 and was a graduate teaching assistant at Ohio University.

Kainaz joined the multimedia team at National Public Radio (NPR) in December 2011, and is currently based in Washington, D.C.

Ep 40: International Women’s Media Foundation

“The IWMF works to unleash the power of female journalists to transform the global news media. Our fellows and grantees — both freelance and staff journalists — become experts in reporting in underserved regions, generate must-read stories, align with top outlets, and bring critical issues affecting women and others to light. We are the only organization that provides safety training, byline opportunities, and emergency support tailored to female journalists and photographers around the world.”

Heather Gies

To Donate click HERE

Ep. 39 Nolan Ryan Trowe on shooting while disabled

New York-based photojournalist Nolan Ryan Trowe discusses his work before and after an accident that left him disabled and his collaboration with Adhiambo Mitchell, who lost both legs in a car accident, as he cares for his two sons. His series on Mitchell was a feature in the New York Times Lens blog.

Ep 38 Kristen Chick: Sexual Harassment in the Photojournalism Community

Kristen Chick is a freelance journalist who covers migration, women’s issues, and human rights in Europe and the Middle East. She has been published in the Washington Post, LA Times, Foreign Policy, and others.

Her explosive piece about sexual harassment in the photojournalism community  for Columbia Journalism Review can be read here.

Ep: 37 Laura Beltrán Villamizar

Laura Beltrán Villamizar  is a photography editor and writer born in Bogotá, Colombia. She is the Projects Picture Editor for NPR, working with the organization’s growing efforts to shape their enterprise visual journalism. She is also the founder of Native – a non-profit platform dedicated to the promotion and development of visual journalists from under-represented regions and communities. Laura has written extensively on localize non-western visual journalism and photography for Nieman Reports at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism of Harvard University.

Before founding Native, she worked at the World Press Photo Foundation, where she led educational programs in Latin America and co-produced the yearly Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam.

Prior to joining World Press Photo, she was Associate Photo Editor for Revolve Magazine where she oversaw long-term features, international commissions for print and online, and curated the magazine’s emphasis on visual storytelling.

Laura has served on the jury for The Catchlight Fellowship 2018, The FENCE at Photoville in 2018, and The Sinchi Photography Competition for Indigenous and Native Photographers 2017. She was also selected for the Alexia’s Foundation Seminar: “Latin America: Stories That Drive Change” (Miami, 2017). Laura currently lives and works in Washington, D.C.

 

Ep: 35 A.D. Coleman and the Myth of Robert Capa

A. D. Coleman has published 8 books and more than 2500 essays on photography and related subjects. Formerly a columnist for the Village Voice, the New York Times, and the New York Observer, Coleman has contributed to such periodicals as ARTnews, Art On Paper, and Technology Review. His syndicated essays on mass media, new communication technologies, art, and photography have been featured in such periodicals as Juliet Art Magazine (Italy), European Photography (Germany), and Art Today (China). His work has been translated into 21 languages and published in 31 countries.

“There’s no denying that Capa experienced a failure of nerve at Omaha Beach and hightailed it out of there as fast as he could.”-A.D. Coleman

Ep 34: World Press and Pulitzer Winners with Allen Murabayashi

This week we discuss the past, present (scandals), and future of both the controversial World Press  Photo 2018 and Pulitzer winners for photography with our fav photo pundit and Photoshelter co-founder Allen Murabayashi.

Was this year’s Burning Protester controversial?

 

Ep: 33 Michele Bogre

Michelle Bogre is an Associate Professor of Photography and the former Chair of the Photography Department at Parsons School of Design in New York.  She is also a copyright lawyer, documentary photographer and author of two books: Photography As Activism: Images for Social Change, and Photography 4.0: A Teaching Guide for the 21st Century, both published by Focal Press, a subsidiary of Taylor and Francis. Photography as Activism was selected by Rice University in Houston, Texas as the Fall 2014 Common Reading, which is a practice of selecting one book to be read by all incoming students. Her photographs and/or writing has been published in books, including the Time-Life Annual photography series, The Family of Women, Beauty Bound, The Design Dictionary (Birkhauser Press, 2008) and photographer Trey Ratcliffe’s monograph, Light Falls like Bits.  Her photographs have been featured in group shows: The Way We Work at the Lawrence O’Brien Gallery in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. and Beauty Culture at the Annenberg Space for Photography in LA.

EP25: Daniella Zalcman

This week we talk with prolific documentary photographer Daniella Zalcman about her insight into colonialism in the United States, as well as her role as founder of Women Photograph, a project elevating the visions of women and non-binary photographers world wide.

Daniella Zalcman is a documentary photographer based in London and New York, whos work focuses on the legacies of colonization, from the rise of homophobia in East Africa to the forced assimilation education of indigenous children in North America. She has received the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting grant, is a fellow with the International Women’s Media Foundation, and the founder of Women Photograph.

EP24: Elizabeth Renstrom

We’re here with Elizabeth Renstrom, a photographer and photo editor of VICE magazine, talking about how to best pitch your work to editors, the changing landscape of photography online, and the insights that come with photo editing on such a large-scale platform.

EP23: Matika Wilbur

This week Matika Wilbur talks about Project 562, her mission to photograph over 562 federally recognized Native American tribes in The United States. Traveling from state to state in her RV, Wilbur is creating an unprecedented body of images and oral history of Native Americans.

Matika Wilbur is a photographer from the Swinomish and Tulalip peoples of coastal Washington. She has been been traveling and photographing for project 565 for the past 5 years.She has visited members of over 300 sovereign nations throughout 40 states.

EP20: Gabe Dinsmoor

This week we talk with Gabe Dinsmoor, one of the cinematographers of the just released HBO film Baltimore Rising , a documentary following several activist and police officers during and after the 2015 uprising that took place in the city.

Gabe Dinsmoor is a cinematographer, photographers and producer from Baltimore, MD. In October 2015, Gabe began helping film a feature documentary for HBO called Baltimore Rising about the death of Freddie Gray and the Baltimore Uprising. He has worked as a camera op on The Keepers, a Netflix docu-series that explores the unsolved murder of the nun Sister Cathy Cesnik, and co-directed and shot a documentary titled Pyne Poynt about a little league coached by ex-convicts in Camden, NJ, America’s most dangerous and poorest city.

EP19: Brian Ulrich


Exploring post 9/11 America through retail spaces, this week we discuss consumerism and photographing the ubiquitous with Brian Ulrich.

Brian Ulrich’s work focuses on consumer culture, retail spaces , and commercialism as it plays out in the landscape of America. His works been featured in a long list of museums and publications: Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, The New York Public Library, Time Magazine, Vice, Mother Jones, and more. Additionally, he is a recipient of a 2009 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, and an associate professor at the Rhode Island School of Design for photography. You can find his books, Is This Place Great or What, and Retail Relics and Ephemera, here.

Ep18 Live at DC Fotoweek

We took the show on the road to the 10th anniversary of DC Fotoweek. At the beautiful Embassy of Spain, we caught up the photojournalist who caught a now iconic shot from Charlottesville ; celebrity organizers, like for the Magnum at 70 photo-show, and winners of this year’s FotoWeek competitions. Give it a listen.

EP17: Eros Hoagland

What does it mean to photograph conflict? Where is the photographers place in a landscape of violence? This week we talk with Eros Hoagland about his book Reckoning at the Frontier.

Eros Hoagland is a prolific freelance photographer and videographer who’s work from the last 20 years spans from war zones in Afghanistan, to gangs in El Salvador, to on-set locations of major motion pictures. He’s been featured in the NY times, National Geographic, Time and more. His recent book, Reckoning at the Frontier, features photos from years spent along the border of the US and Mexico, primarily in Tijuana and Ciudad Juárez.

EP16: André Chung

Discussing representation, misrepresentation , and making space for yourself as a photographer with André Chung.

André Chung is an award winning photographer whose career spans about 20 years, shooting for the Baltimore Sun, The Washington Post Magazine, The Atlantic, Ebony Magazine, the NAACP and Apple among others. Nominated for the Pulitzer Prize five times while at the Baltimore Sun, André has also received the George Polk Award and the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award. His work is in the permanent collection at the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

EP13: Josh Sisk

Discussing photographing live music, from local punk shows to big time stars with Josh Sisk.

Josh Sisk is a Baltimore based photographer who is most well known for his work shooting live music. He is a contributing Photographer for the Washington Post, Baltimore City Paper, Decibel, Noisey, and has been featured in many other publications across the world, including Rolling Stone.

EP11: Amy Davis

 

How newspaper photography has changed in recent decades, and exploring Baltimore’s forgotten movie theaters with Amy Davis.

Amy Davis has been a staff photographer at the Baltimore Sun newspaper since 1987, photographing a wide range of subjects and stories of life in Baltimore city. Her book ,Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters, is a chronicle of Baltimore’s historic and ever- changing movie theaters over the past century.

flickeringtreasures.com 

https://www.facebook.com/flickeringtreasures

EP10: Gabriela Bulisova and Mark Isaac

What does it mean to work as a team- and to give your subject a direct hand in making their image? Gabriella and Mark discuss working with incarcerated women, and the collaborative relationships that they have formed.

Gabriela Bulisova and Mark Isaac are documentary photographers based in Washington, DC. For the past seven years, Bulisova and Isaac have collaborated on projects focused on mass incarceration. Their current work highlights the criminalization of mental illness and the trauma to prison pipeline for women who have experienced abuse. Bulisova and Isaac will be spending the coming year in Ukraine, working on projects supported by a Fulbright grant.

 

EP9: Webster Phillips,III

This week we talk with Webster Phillips, III, about continuing a family legacy photographing Black life and culture in Baltimore.

Webster Phillips,III, comes from a family of photographers whose collective work spans close to 70 years. Philips Grandfather, Henry Phillips, Sr. , and father, Irving H. Phillips, Jr., were prolific photographers in their own right, and now Phillips continues the three generation tradition of documenting life in Baltimore through photography.

 

_________

Correction: Phillips mentions the book I Dream A World, which is not by Deborah Willis but by Brian Lanker, and edited by Barbara Summers.

EP8: Clary Estes

 

 

What is it like to live with the people you photograph, in a country that is not your own? Clary Estes discusses long term documentary work.

Clary Estes was born and raised in Kentucky and is currently living internationally and working on a variety of photography projects in Japan, China, and DC. She graduated with a Masters Degree in New Media Photojournalism from the Corcoran College of Art and Design in 2013, and is now living and working in rural Moldova with the Peace Corps. Estes’ interest is in long-term documentary projects, and writing biting essays like “Fuck Photojournalism.”

EP7: Photo Editor Tony Bell

Tony Bell is the Guardian Observer New Review‘s picture editor in London. Bell discusses what it’s like to be a photo editor and what he looks for in photographers in a fast changing business.  Follow him at @bellyboy69 on Twitter and Instagram: tony_bell_observer.

EP6: Matt Roth

Juggling personal work and commercial assignments, Matt Roth tells us how to keep yourself very busy.

Matt Roth is a freelance photographer who shoots for The New York Times, AARP, The Pivot Group, Wall Street Journal, Factory Athletics, Education Week, Chronicle of Higher Education, Printer’s Row Journal,  Earthjustice, Buzzfeed, and NPR among others. His current personal project is a visual ethnography of American Micronationalists which we discuss on the show this week.

EP5: Shan Wallace

What does it mean to rediscover your hometown through photography? How can photography be effectively used as a tool for activism? Shan discusses how she uses imagery to redirect a narrative of Baltimore and it’s people.

Shan is an award-winning photographer, writer, and freedom fighter from East Baltimore. Merging her journalism degree from Bowie State University with her love for photography, Shan’s work focuses on the experiences, identities and struggles of black life. Instagram.

 

EP4: Jennifer Bishop

Discussing the ever-changing industry of newspaper journalism, and advocating for people with disabilities through photography with Jennifer Bishop.

Bishop is Baltimore based photojournalist and portrait photographer with more than 35 years of experience shooting all over the world. She was the first photographer for the Baltimore City Paper, which began publishing in 1977. She also writes and photographs for projects that advocate for people with disabilities.

EP3: Theo Anthony

In this weeks episode, we talk with Theo Anthony about intersections of film and photography.

Anthony is a writer, photographer, and filmmaker currently based in Baltimore, MD. His work been featured by the The Atlantic, Vice, BBC World News, and other international media outlets. His films have received premieres at the Toronto International Film Festival, Locarno International Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, SXSW, and Anthology Film Archives. In 2015, he was named one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film”. His first feature, RAT FILM, debuted at the 2016 Locarno International Film Festival to critical acclaim, with Richard Brody of the New Yorker calling it “one of the most extraordinary, visionary inspirations in the recent cinema”. RAT FILM will be distributed domestically by Cinema Guild and internationally by Visit Films. Instagram.

EP2: Staff Sgt. Kenny Holston

Staff Sgt. Kenny Holston talks about his work as an air force photographer, which won him the 2015 Military Photographer of the Year award.

Holston is a United States Air Force photojournalist and the 2015 Military Photographer of the Year. Hailing from Texas, Holston has served the Air Force for11 years. He has an extreme passion for storytelling through a variety of media platforms. He’s a motivated individual who loves to learn and push the envelope. His strengths are conflict,combat, spot news, and feature photojournalism. Instagram.

EP1: Pete Voelker

Theo Anthony discusses navigating America road trip style through photography, while balancing professional work with personal.

Born May 1987 on Scott Air Force base in Illinois Pete Voelker was raised in the Maryland suburbs near Washington DC. Voelker studied photography at the Maryland Institute College of Art from 2005-2009. After moving to New York City in 2008 he worked for photographer Ryan McGinley until 2012. Since then, Voelker has focused on documentary work and building his commercial photography portfolio. In May 2015 he released his debut book, titled “Here’s Looking at You”, a collection of more than 175 photographs captured on 35mm film while traveling to each of the 48 contiguous United States of America.