Ep 70: Jackie Sofia

Jackie is the creator and facilitator of The Narrative Projects. The initiative uses documentary strategies and participatory media to illuminate the unknown stories of the refugee experience in the MENA region and North America.

Jacqueline (Jackie) Sofia is an artist and educator whose work stems from participatory methodologies, combining ethnographic research and investigative reporting. Her work focuses primarily on marginalized and underrepresented narratives in the Middle East and North America. Jackie is the creator and facilitator of The Narrative Projects. The initiative uses documentary strategies and participatory media to illuminate the unknown stories of the refugee experience in the MENA region and North America. She is the co-founder of a social enterprise based in Jerash Camp, and the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship (2011-12) for her research on the ex-Gazan refugee community in Jordan.

She has produced content for outlets including Monocle24, News Deeply, NPR’s Weekend Edition, WNYC’s On The Media and WHYY’s The Pulse. She has also reported for the Bucks County Herald in Bucks County PA, and the MENA news platform, Wamda. She is a regular producer/contributor for the Middle East radio documentary podcast, Kerning Cultures.

Women work in the Sitti social enterprise workshop in Jerash “Gaza” Refugee Camp in Jordan, on May 28, 2018. Among these women and artisan soap makers is Ikram- a mother and wife. She is also the daughter-in-law to a first-generation woman of Jerash “Gaza” Refugee Camp, Um Fatteh. (Photo by Jacqueline M. Sofia)

Shooting War Pt1: Lauren Walsh

Part one of our conversation on shooting war and conflict. Lauren Walsh, an expert on conflict photography, is a professor and writer. She teaches at The New School and New York University, where she is the director of the Gallatin Photojournalism Lab. She is also the director of Lost Rolls America, a national public archive of photography and memory. 

Walsh’s newest book, Conversations on Conflict Photography (2019), examines the value of documenting war and humanitarian crisis in the contemporary moment. She is the editor/co-editor of three other books on photography: Macondo, a photo book documenting the long-term conflict in Colombia; Millennium Villages Project, a photography book on efforts to relieve extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa; and The Future of Text and Image, with collected essays on visual culture and literary studies. She has also published widely in academic and mainstream media. Walsh is currently co-directing Biography of a Photo, a documentary film about two iconic images of conflict, and her research concentrates on questions of visual media and ethics. She holds a PhD from Columbia University and has been distinguished with NYU’s Excellence in Teaching award.

Members of the Serbian paramilitary group known as Arkan’s Tigers with Muslim civilians who have just been shot, Bijeljina, Bosnia, 1992. © Ron Haviv/VII.
The mother of Khan Mohammad, a three-month-old child who passed away due to the cold, is comforted before the child is washed and buried in the Nasaji Bagrami Camp for displaced persons in Kabul, Afghanistan, February 8, 2012. © Andrea Bruce/NOOR

EP 51: Colette Veasey-Cullors

we interviewed contemporary photographer and educator Colette Veasey-Cullors. Colette’s work explores the themes of race, class, identity, and socio-economic issues

As we wrap up the Black History Month, we interviewed contemporary photographer and educator Colette Veasey-Cullors. Colette’s work explores the themes of race, class, identity, and socio-economic issues, and invites the viewers to investigate their personal connection to the underserved and underrepresented people.  Colette has been teaching for over two decades, and has taught at Howard University, a historically black school, and MICA. She is currently serving as Associate Dean of Design and Media at MICA.

In this interview, Colette discusses her role as an educator, parent, and community activist. 

Ep 50: Paul Conroy Talks Marie Colvin and photojournalism in Syria

Photojournalist and author Paul Conroy talks about his time in Syria and working with journalist Marie Colvin who was targeted and killed in Homs, Syria. Their story is the subject of both the documentary Under the Wire and feature film, A Private War, which is currently streaming.

Ep. 48 Photo Year in Review with Reading the Pictures’ Michael Shaw

Michael Shaw is an analyst of news photos and visual journalism, and a frequent lecturer and writer on visual politics, photojournalism and media literacy, Michael is the founder and publisher of Reading the Pictures along with Cara Finnegan, who is Communication Professor, University of Illinois, author of Making Photography Matter: A Viewer’s History from the Civil War to the Great Depression and Picturing Poverty: Print Culture and FSA Photographs, and moderator of Reading the Pictures Salon.

Michael discusses the history of the site, the salon Chatting The Pictures, and the year in photojournalism.

Reading The Pictures’ stories/photos of the year.

World Press 2018 State of Photojournalism
RTP’s Instagram photos of the year.

MeToo in Photojournalism:
Migrant crisis in photos:

Ep 46: Talking Sports Photography with Kate Frese

Photojournalist Kate Frese is known for her dynamic photos of the Philadelphia Flyers hockey team as well as her music and editorial work. Frese is the first sports photographer we’ve had on the pod and we couldn’t have been more excited to talk to her about all things photography and the current climate of sports photography.

Photojournalist Kate Frese is known for her dynamic photos of the Philadelphia Flyers hockey team as well as her music and editorial work. Frese is the first sports photographer we’ve had on the pod and we couldn’t have been more excited to talk to her about all things photography and the current climate of sports photography.


Ep 44: Photojournalist Julia Rendleman

“I think we have seen the images of needles searching for veins and people in very sad circumstances, living on the streets or prostituting. Some call this ‘needle porn.’ I don’t have any pictures to add to that sort of reporting,”-Julia Rendleman, from her series ‘A Daily Fight For Control’ featured on  The Marshall Project

Julia Rendleman is a freelance photojournalist based in Richmond, Virginia. She has received two grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting – one for a video story about the effects global economics have on Jamaican farmers and another for a photo essay about Bhutanese refugees living in Nepal. In 2010, she was named a Getty Images Emerging Talent Photographer. That same year she received a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography for a story about a women’s prison in southern Illinois. Julia contributes to The Washington Post, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, New York Times Magazine, U.S. News & World Report, VICE and others. She is listed with other great photographers at Women Photograph.

Ep 41: Vox’s Kainaz Amaria on #MeToo in Photojournalism

This Ep. continues to look a the #MeToo movement in photojournalism with Vox’s Kainaz Amaria.  Her piece can be read here.

As Vox Visuals Editor, Kainaz runs an interdisciplinary team specializing in graphics, interactives, photography, data and design. Previously, she was an editor on NPR’s Visual Team. Before all the desk jobs, she was a freelance photojournalist based in Mumbai, India. Her clients included The New York Times, Vogue India, and Reuters. Prior to that, she worked for the St. Petersburg Times in Florida. In 2010, she was a Fulbright Scholar and completed a short film on the Parsi Zoroastrian community in Mumbai.

Her images and multimedia collaborations have been recognized by contests including CPOY, Women in Photojournalism, Atlanta Photojournalism Conference, the National Press Photographers’ Contest and the South Asian Journalist Association. She was named a Chips Quinn Scholar in 2007 and was a graduate teaching assistant at Ohio University.

Kainaz joined the multimedia team at National Public Radio (NPR) in December 2011, and is currently based in Washington, D.C.

Ep 40: International Women’s Media Foundation

“The IWMF works to unleash the power of female journalists to transform the global news media. Our fellows and grantees — both freelance and staff journalists — become experts in reporting in underserved regions, generate must-read stories, align with top outlets, and bring critical issues affecting women and others to light. We are the only organization that provides safety training, byline opportunities, and emergency support tailored to female journalists and photographers around the world.”

Heather Gies

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