Ep 40: International Women’s Media Foundation

“The IWMF works to unleash the power of female journalists to transform the global news media. Our fellows and grantees — both freelance and staff journalists — become experts in reporting in underserved regions, generate must-read stories, align with top outlets, and bring critical issues affecting women and others to light. We are the only organization that provides safety training, byline opportunities, and emergency support tailored to female journalists and photographers around the world.”

Heather Gies

To Donate click HERE

Ep. 39 Nolan Ryan Trowe on shooting while disabled

New York-based photojournalist Nolan Ryan Trowe discusses his work before and after an accident that left him disabled and his collaboration with Adhiambo Mitchell, who lost both legs in a car accident, as he cares for his two sons. His series on Mitchell was a feature in the New York Times Lens blog.

Ep 38 Kristen Chick: Sexual Harassment in the Photojournalism Community

Kristen Chick is a freelance journalist who covers migration, women’s issues, and human rights in Europe and the Middle East. She has been published in the Washington Post, LA Times, Foreign Policy, and others.

Her explosive piece about sexual harassment in the photojournalism community  for Columbia Journalism Review can be read here.

Ep: 37 Laura Beltrán Villamizar

Laura Beltrán Villamizar  is a photography editor and writer born in Bogotá, Colombia. She is the Projects Picture Editor for NPR, working with the organization’s growing efforts to shape their enterprise visual journalism. She is also the founder of Native – a non-profit platform dedicated to the promotion and development of visual journalists from under-represented regions and communities. Laura has written extensively on localize non-western visual journalism and photography for Nieman Reports at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism of Harvard University.

Before founding Native, she worked at the World Press Photo Foundation, where she led educational programs in Latin America and co-produced the yearly Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam.

Prior to joining World Press Photo, she was Associate Photo Editor for Revolve Magazine where she oversaw long-term features, international commissions for print and online, and curated the magazine’s emphasis on visual storytelling.

Laura has served on the jury for The Catchlight Fellowship 2018, The FENCE at Photoville in 2018, and The Sinchi Photography Competition for Indigenous and Native Photographers 2017. She was also selected for the Alexia’s Foundation Seminar: “Latin America: Stories That Drive Change” (Miami, 2017). Laura currently lives and works in Washington, D.C.

 

Ep 36: Kyle Grantham

This week we talk to National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) outgoing region chair Kyle Grantham about the relevancy of such agencies, working in a small market like Delaware, covering Joe Biden, and his work as a professional photojournalist.

Ep: 35 A.D. Coleman and the Myth of Robert Capa

A. D. Coleman has published 8 books and more than 2500 essays on photography and related subjects. Formerly a columnist for the Village Voice, the New York Times, and the New York Observer, Coleman has contributed to such periodicals as ARTnews, Art On Paper, and Technology Review. His syndicated essays on mass media, new communication technologies, art, and photography have been featured in such periodicals as Juliet Art Magazine (Italy), European Photography (Germany), and Art Today (China). His work has been translated into 21 languages and published in 31 countries.

“There’s no denying that Capa experienced a failure of nerve at Omaha Beach and hightailed it out of there as fast as he could.”-A.D. Coleman

Ep 34: World Press and Pulitzer Winners with Allen Murabayashi

This week we discuss the past, present (scandals), and future of both the controversial World Press  Photo 2018 and Pulitzer winners for photography with our fav photo pundit and Photoshelter co-founder Allen Murabayashi.

Was this year’s Burning Protester controversial?

 

Ep: 33 Michele Bogre

Michelle Bogre is an Associate Professor of Photography and the former Chair of the Photography Department at Parsons School of Design in New York.  She is also a copyright lawyer, documentary photographer and author of two books: Photography As Activism: Images for Social Change, and Photography 4.0: A Teaching Guide for the 21st Century, both published by Focal Press, a subsidiary of Taylor and Francis. Photography as Activism was selected by Rice University in Houston, Texas as the Fall 2014 Common Reading, which is a practice of selecting one book to be read by all incoming students. Her photographs and/or writing has been published in books, including the Time-Life Annual photography series, The Family of Women, Beauty Bound, The Design Dictionary (Birkhauser Press, 2008) and photographer Trey Ratcliffe’s monograph, Light Falls like Bits.  Her photographs have been featured in group shows: The Way We Work at the Lawrence O’Brien Gallery in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. and Beauty Culture at the Annenberg Space for Photography in LA.

Ep32: Sam Herron

Photographer Sam Herron‘s long road to photography included going from music, to wealth, to homelessness. While homeless, Herron decided to document the world around him from the inside out. His work has appeared in the Omaha World-Herald, and his series “Street Life Chronicles,” was on display at the Creighton University’s Skutt Center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ep31: Smita Sharma

This week we talk to photojournalist Smita Sharma, about her work which covers India’s domestic servitude abuse, sex trafficking in Central Africa Republic, child brides in Nepal, and more. Smita Sharma is an independent photojournalist based in Delhi, Kolkata and New York. Her work primarily focusses on gender violence and human rights issues.
Her work has been published in various international publications including CNN, The Washington Post, New York Times, BBC, TIME Lightbox, The Globe and Mail, Spiegel, Channel 4, Quartz, Caravan Magazine, Newsweek, Human Rights Watch among others. Her work has been screened and exhibited in various countries including USA, India, Cambodia, Myanmar, South Korea, France, UK and Saudi Arabia.

Beena, 15, was going to be married in eight days when a distant relative in his forties with a wife and daughter volunteered to take her to meet her mother who lived in a nearby village. Instead, she was abducted and taken to a neighbouring state of Bihar. There, she was raped repeatedly for weeks. The police rescued her after her grandfather filed a complaint. The perpetrator’s family later pressured Beena to withdraw the case.

Ep30: Michael A. McCoy

Photojournalist and Iraq War veteran Michael A. McCoy drops in the pod to discuss shooting PTSD shooting in civilian life, and his project on black Trump supporters. His work has appeared in Time Magazine, Baltimore Sun, Petapixel, and more.

Ep29: Joseph Rushmore

Joseph Rushmore is a freelance photojournalist currently living in Tulsa, OK. He focuses on breaking news and immersive, in depth stories. He has spent time covering Hurricane Harvey, RNC, DNC, Standing Rock, protests in St. Louis and Tulsa, the opioid crisis, environmental issues and Native sovereignty in Oklahoma, among other stories. He shoots for The Financial Times, Huffington Post, The Tulsa Voice, Sierra Magazine, Tulsa World.