Ep 71: Roger May and Photographing Appalachia

Roger May is an Appalachian American photographer and writer based in Charleston, West Virginia. He was born in the Tug River Valley on the West Virginia and Kentucky border, in the heart of Hatfield and McCoy country. His work explores the complicated history of place, faith, and identity in the coalfields. In 2014, he founded the crowdsourced Looking at Appalachia project. He lectures about his work and about the visual representation of Appalachia.

Roger May is an Appalachian American photographer and writer based in Charleston, West Virginia. He was born in the Tug River Valley on the West Virginia and Kentucky border, in the heart of Hatfield and McCoy country. His work explores the complicated history of place, faith, and identity in the coalfields. In 2014, he founded the crowdsourced Looking at Appalachia project. He lectures about his work and about the visual representation of Appalachia.

From the Looking at Appalachia series:

  Ashleigh Coleman . September 11, 2019. Choctaw County, Mississippi.
Ashleigh Coleman. September 11, 2019. Choctaw County, Mississippi.


Ep 70: Jackie Sofia

Jackie is the creator and facilitator of The Narrative Projects. The initiative uses documentary strategies and participatory media to illuminate the unknown stories of the refugee experience in the MENA region and North America.

Jacqueline (Jackie) Sofia is an artist and educator whose work stems from participatory methodologies, combining ethnographic research and investigative reporting. Her work focuses primarily on marginalized and underrepresented narratives in the Middle East and North America. Jackie is the creator and facilitator of The Narrative Projects. The initiative uses documentary strategies and participatory media to illuminate the unknown stories of the refugee experience in the MENA region and North America. She is the co-founder of a social enterprise based in Jerash Camp, and the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship (2011-12) for her research on the ex-Gazan refugee community in Jordan.

She has produced content for outlets including Monocle24, News Deeply, NPR’s Weekend Edition, WNYC’s On The Media and WHYY’s The Pulse. She has also reported for the Bucks County Herald in Bucks County PA, and the MENA news platform, Wamda. She is a regular producer/contributor for the Middle East radio documentary podcast, Kerning Cultures.

Women work in the Sitti social enterprise workshop in Jerash “Gaza” Refugee Camp in Jordan, on May 28, 2018. Among these women and artisan soap makers is Ikram- a mother and wife. She is also the daughter-in-law to a first-generation woman of Jerash “Gaza” Refugee Camp, Um Fatteh. (Photo by Jacqueline M. Sofia)

Shooting War P3: Author Dr. Anthony Feinstein

Shooting War contains 18 profiles of photographers exploring their lives as filters between conflict and the general population and the effect they have on us and themselves in this endeavor. Includes such luminaries as Don McCullin, Tim Page, and Ron Haviv.

Anthony Feinstein, author of the book Shooting War, is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto and a neuropsychiatrist. His research and clinical work focuses on people with multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and Conversion Disorder. War contains 18 profiles of photographers exploring their lives as filters between conflict and the general population and the effect they have on us and themselves in this endeavor. Includes such luminaries as Don McCullin, Tim Page, and Ron Haviv.

Shooting War Pt2: Ben Brody

Ben Brody is an independent photographer, educator, and picture editor working on long-form projects related to the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and their aftermath. His first book, Attention Servicemember, published by Red Hook Editions and designed by Kummer & Herrman, has been shortlisted for the Aperture – Paris Photo First Book Award

Ben Brody is an independent photographer, educator, and picture editor working on long-form projects related to the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and their aftermath. His first book, Attention Servicemember, published by Red Hook Editions and designed by Kummer & Herrman, has been shortlisted for the Aperture – Paris Photo First Book Award

Ben holds an MFA from Hartford Art School’s International Low-Residency Photography program. He resides in western Massachusetts.

Shooting War Pt1: Lauren Walsh

Part one of our conversation on shooting war and conflict. Lauren Walsh, an expert on conflict photography, is a professor and writer. She teaches at The New School and New York University, where she is the director of the Gallatin Photojournalism Lab. She is also the director of Lost Rolls America, a national public archive of photography and memory. 

Walsh’s newest book, Conversations on Conflict Photography (2019), examines the value of documenting war and humanitarian crisis in the contemporary moment. She is the editor/co-editor of three other books on photography: Macondo, a photo book documenting the long-term conflict in Colombia; Millennium Villages Project, a photography book on efforts to relieve extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa; and The Future of Text and Image, with collected essays on visual culture and literary studies. She has also published widely in academic and mainstream media. Walsh is currently co-directing Biography of a Photo, a documentary film about two iconic images of conflict, and her research concentrates on questions of visual media and ethics. She holds a PhD from Columbia University and has been distinguished with NYU’s Excellence in Teaching award.

Members of the Serbian paramilitary group known as Arkan’s Tigers with Muslim civilians who have just been shot, Bijeljina, Bosnia, 1992. © Ron Haviv/VII.
The mother of Khan Mohammad, a three-month-old child who passed away due to the cold, is comforted before the child is washed and buried in the Nasaji Bagrami Camp for displaced persons in Kabul, Afghanistan, February 8, 2012. © Andrea Bruce/NOOR

Ep 64: Claire Beckett

Born and raised in Chicago, Claire Beckett earned a BA in Anthropology at Kenyon College. She then worked as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Benin, West Africa, before going on to earn an MFA in Photography at Mass College of Art.

She is represented by Carroll and Sons Gallery in Boston. Her photographs have been featured in solo exhibitions at Carroll and Sons, Bernard Toale Gallery, the University of Rhode Island, and the Wadsworth Atheneum and in group shows at Mass MoCA, the National Portrait Gallery, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Aperture Foundation, the Haggerty Museum, the deCordova Museum, the Photographic Resource Center, Silver Eye Center for Photography, Hendershot Gallery, FOTODOK (NL), and the Noorderlicht Festival (NL), among others. She is a recipient of an Artadia Award, a Blanche Coleman Award, and a Massachusetts Cultural Council Grant, and has been artist-in-residence at Light Work. Her book dummy “Hearts and Minds” is shortlisted for the 2018 Book Dummy Award at Unseen Platform, Amsterdam.

From the series: Hearts and Minds

Ep 63: Capital Gazette Photojournalist Paul Gillespie

Photojournalist Paul Gillespie survived a mass shooting at the Capital Gazette‘s offices in Annapolis, Maryland in 2018. In the year since, he has been coping with depression by taking portraits of the surviving journalists at the newspaper while working full time at the paper. He talks about using photography as a coping mechanism and what it’s like to be a survivor. His show, Journalists Matter: Faces of the Capital Gazette opens Oct 6th at ArtFarm Annapolis.

Ep 52: Jim Mortram on Small Town Inertia

Jim has been photographing the lives of people in his community who, through physical and mental problems and a failing social security system, face isolation and loneliness in their daily lives.

Jim Mortram lives near Dereham, a small town in Norfolk. Dereham is no different from thousands of other communities throughout Britain, where increasing numbers of people struggle to survive at a time of welfare cuts and failing health services. For the last seven years, Jim has been photographing the lives of people in his community who, through physical and mental problems and a failing social security system, face isolation and loneliness in their daily lives. His work covers difficult subjects such as disability, addiction and self-harm, but is always with hope and dignity, focusing upon the strength and resilience of the people he photographs.”-Photobookstore UK

His work from the book Small Town Inertia by Bluecoat Press is on show at The Side Gallery.

Ep 50: Paul Conroy Talks Marie Colvin and photojournalism in Syria

Photojournalist and author Paul Conroy talks about his time in Syria and working with journalist Marie Colvin who was targeted and killed in Homs, Syria. Their story is the subject of both the documentary Under the Wire and feature film, A Private War, which is currently streaming.

Ep: 49 NFL Photographer Shawn Hubbard

If you’ve seen an iconic photo of a Baltimore Raven, it’s probably the work of Shawn Hubbard. Hubbard talks about what it takes to shoot in a highly charged football environment and when not to snap a photo. Hubbard’s work is in the NFL Photography Hall of Fame. He shoots The Baltimore Ravens for the NFL, Under Armour, Red Bull, Green Bay Packers, NBC, Riddell, Big Ten Network, M&T Bank, CNN, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, SHAPE Magazine, and New York Magazine.

Image result for shawn hubbard nfl
copyright Shawn Hubbard.

Ep. 48 Photo Year in Review with Reading the Pictures’ Michael Shaw

Michael Shaw is an analyst of news photos and visual journalism, and a frequent lecturer and writer on visual politics, photojournalism and media literacy, Michael is the founder and publisher of Reading the Pictures along with Cara Finnegan, who is Communication Professor, University of Illinois, author of Making Photography Matter: A Viewer’s History from the Civil War to the Great Depression and Picturing Poverty: Print Culture and FSA Photographs, and moderator of Reading the Pictures Salon.

Michael discusses the history of the site, the salon Chatting The Pictures, and the year in photojournalism.

Reading The Pictures’ stories/photos of the year.

World Press 2018 State of Photojournalism
RTP’s Instagram photos of the year.

MeToo in Photojournalism:
Migrant crisis in photos:

Ep. 47 All Things Photobook with Ben Smith


We welcome photographer and podcaster Ben Smith of A Small Voice, based in the UK. We’ll be discussing the year in photobooks, personally bought and otherwise and Ben’s pod in which he speaks to international photographers about their work.

Ben’s Books:

Joe’s Books:

Paolo Pellegrin : Un’antologia

Salgado: Scent of a Dream: Travels in the World of Coffee Photos

Abbas: In Whose Name?: The Islamic World after 9/11 Photos

The Charcoal Bookclub model.

Ep 46: Talking Sports Photography with Kate Frese

Photojournalist Kate Frese is known for her dynamic photos of the Philadelphia Flyers hockey team as well as her music and editorial work. Frese is the first sports photographer we’ve had on the pod and we couldn’t have been more excited to talk to her about all things photography and the current climate of sports photography.

Photojournalist Kate Frese is known for her dynamic photos of the Philadelphia Flyers hockey team as well as her music and editorial work. Frese is the first sports photographer we’ve had on the pod and we couldn’t have been more excited to talk to her about all things photography and the current climate of sports photography.


Ep 45: Writer and Editor Brandon Soderberg on covering the opioid crisis

Brandon Soderberg is not a photographer but he is a journalist and an open drug user and he came on the show to discuss the problems with “opioid crisis” photography and in general, how the media covers heroin users. Soderberg is a journalist based in Baltimore, Maryland who covers crime, drugs, and police. He is a former staffer at Spin, the former editor in chief of Baltimore City Paper and the co-founder of the short-lived Baltimore Beat. He has contributed to The Appeal, FACT Magazine, Pitchfork, Vice, Village Voice, and Washington City Paper, among other publications. He currently reviews cannabis for the Colorado Springs Independent and is writing I’ve Got A Monster, a book about the Baltimore police department’s Gun Trace Task Force scandal for St. Martin’s Press with his co-writer Baynard Woods. His most recent stories have been about a spy plane in Baltimore, a brutal police beating, and Johns Hopkins University students’ “disorientation guide.” He believes all drugs should be legal and loves dogs.

Ep 44: Photojournalist Julia Rendleman

“I think we have seen the images of needles searching for veins and people in very sad circumstances, living on the streets or prostituting. Some call this ‘needle porn.’ I don’t have any pictures to add to that sort of reporting,”-Julia Rendleman, from her series ‘A Daily Fight For Control’ featured on  The Marshall Project

Julia Rendleman is a freelance photojournalist based in Richmond, Virginia. She has received two grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting – one for a video story about the effects global economics have on Jamaican farmers and another for a photo essay about Bhutanese refugees living in Nepal. In 2010, she was named a Getty Images Emerging Talent Photographer. That same year she received a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography for a story about a women’s prison in southern Illinois. Julia contributes to The Washington Post, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, New York Times Magazine, U.S. News & World Report, VICE and others. She is listed with other great photographers at Women Photograph.

Ep 43: Spirit Photography with author Peter Manseau

Peter Manseau, author of the book  The Apparitionists   talks to us about the history of William Mumler, the founder of so-called spirit photography and the manipulation of photographs during the American Civil War. Manseau’s book is sprinkled with the showmanship of P.T. Barnum, and ends with Mumler’s most famous client (you’ll have to read the book).

Works by Mumler:

Ep 42: Field Notes: The Kids are Alright

In our first Field Notes episode, we leave the studio and interview photojournalism seniors from the Baltimore School For The Arts who sat down for a candid talk about the future of the industry.

Ep 41: Vox’s Kainaz Amaria on #MeToo in Photojournalism

This Ep. continues to look a the #MeToo movement in photojournalism with Vox’s Kainaz Amaria.  Her piece can be read here.

As Vox Visuals Editor, Kainaz runs an interdisciplinary team specializing in graphics, interactives, photography, data and design. Previously, she was an editor on NPR’s Visual Team. Before all the desk jobs, she was a freelance photojournalist based in Mumbai, India. Her clients included The New York Times, Vogue India, and Reuters. Prior to that, she worked for the St. Petersburg Times in Florida. In 2010, she was a Fulbright Scholar and completed a short film on the Parsi Zoroastrian community in Mumbai.

Her images and multimedia collaborations have been recognized by contests including CPOY, Women in Photojournalism, Atlanta Photojournalism Conference, the National Press Photographers’ Contest and the South Asian Journalist Association. She was named a Chips Quinn Scholar in 2007 and was a graduate teaching assistant at Ohio University.

Kainaz joined the multimedia team at National Public Radio (NPR) in December 2011, and is currently based in Washington, D.C.

Ep 40: International Women’s Media Foundation

“The IWMF works to unleash the power of female journalists to transform the global news media. Our fellows and grantees — both freelance and staff journalists — become experts in reporting in underserved regions, generate must-read stories, align with top outlets, and bring critical issues affecting women and others to light. We are the only organization that provides safety training, byline opportunities, and emergency support tailored to female journalists and photographers around the world.”

Heather Gies

To Donate click HERE

Ep. 39 Nolan Ryan Trowe on shooting while disabled

New York-based photojournalist Nolan Ryan Trowe discusses his work before and after an accident that left him disabled and his collaboration with Adhiambo Mitchell, who lost both legs in a car accident, as he cares for his two sons. His series on Mitchell was a feature in the New York Times Lens blog.

Ep 38 Kristen Chick: Sexual Harassment in the Photojournalism Community

Kristen Chick is a freelance journalist who covers migration, women’s issues, and human rights in Europe and the Middle East. She has been published in the Washington Post, LA Times, Foreign Policy, and others.

Her explosive piece about sexual harassment in the photojournalism community  for Columbia Journalism Review can be read here.

Ep: 37 Laura Beltrán Villamizar

Laura Beltrán Villamizar  is a photography editor and writer born in Bogotá, Colombia. She is the Projects Picture Editor for NPR, working with the organization’s growing efforts to shape their enterprise visual journalism. She is also the founder of Native – a non-profit platform dedicated to the promotion and development of visual journalists from under-represented regions and communities. Laura has written extensively on localize non-western visual journalism and photography for Nieman Reports at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism of Harvard University.

Before founding Native, she worked at the World Press Photo Foundation, where she led educational programs in Latin America and co-produced the yearly Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam.

Prior to joining World Press Photo, she was Associate Photo Editor for Revolve Magazine where she oversaw long-term features, international commissions for print and online, and curated the magazine’s emphasis on visual storytelling.

Laura has served on the jury for The Catchlight Fellowship 2018, The FENCE at Photoville in 2018, and The Sinchi Photography Competition for Indigenous and Native Photographers 2017. She was also selected for the Alexia’s Foundation Seminar: “Latin America: Stories That Drive Change” (Miami, 2017). Laura currently lives and works in Washington, D.C.

 

Ep 36: Kyle Grantham

This week we talk to National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) outgoing region chair Kyle Grantham about the relevancy of such agencies, working in a small market like Delaware, covering Joe Biden, and his work as a professional photojournalist.

Ep: 35 A.D. Coleman and the Myth of Robert Capa

A. D. Coleman has published 8 books and more than 2500 essays on photography and related subjects. Formerly a columnist for the Village Voice, the New York Times, and the New York Observer, Coleman has contributed to such periodicals as ARTnews, Art On Paper, and Technology Review. His syndicated essays on mass media, new communication technologies, art, and photography have been featured in such periodicals as Juliet Art Magazine (Italy), European Photography (Germany), and Art Today (China). His work has been translated into 21 languages and published in 31 countries.

“There’s no denying that Capa experienced a failure of nerve at Omaha Beach and hightailed it out of there as fast as he could.”-A.D. Coleman

Ep 34: World Press and Pulitzer Winners with Allen Murabayashi

This week we discuss the past, present (scandals), and future of both the controversial World Press  Photo 2018 and Pulitzer winners for photography with our fav photo pundit and Photoshelter co-founder Allen Murabayashi.

Was this year’s Burning Protester controversial?

 

Ep: 33 Michele Bogre

Michelle Bogre is an Associate Professor of Photography and the former Chair of the Photography Department at Parsons School of Design in New York.  She is also a copyright lawyer, documentary photographer and author of two books: Photography As Activism: Images for Social Change, and Photography 4.0: A Teaching Guide for the 21st Century, both published by Focal Press, a subsidiary of Taylor and Francis. Photography as Activism was selected by Rice University in Houston, Texas as the Fall 2014 Common Reading, which is a practice of selecting one book to be read by all incoming students. Her photographs and/or writing has been published in books, including the Time-Life Annual photography series, The Family of Women, Beauty Bound, The Design Dictionary (Birkhauser Press, 2008) and photographer Trey Ratcliffe’s monograph, Light Falls like Bits.  Her photographs have been featured in group shows: The Way We Work at the Lawrence O’Brien Gallery in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. and Beauty Culture at the Annenberg Space for Photography in LA.

Ep32: Sam Herron

Photographer Sam Herron‘s long road to photography included going from music, to wealth, to homelessness. While homeless, Herron decided to document the world around him from the inside out. His work has appeared in the Omaha World-Herald, and his series “Street Life Chronicles,” was on display at the Creighton University’s Skutt Center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ep31: Smita Sharma

This week we talk to photojournalist Smita Sharma, about her work which covers India’s domestic servitude abuse, sex trafficking in Central Africa Republic, child brides in Nepal, and more. Smita Sharma is an independent photojournalist based in Delhi, Kolkata and New York. Her work primarily focusses on gender violence and human rights issues.
Her work has been published in various international publications including CNN, The Washington Post, New York Times, BBC, TIME Lightbox, The Globe and Mail, Spiegel, Channel 4, Quartz, Caravan Magazine, Newsweek, Human Rights Watch among others. Her work has been screened and exhibited in various countries including USA, India, Cambodia, Myanmar, South Korea, France, UK and Saudi Arabia.

Beena, 15, was going to be married in eight days when a distant relative in his forties with a wife and daughter volunteered to take her to meet her mother who lived in a nearby village. Instead, she was abducted and taken to a neighbouring state of Bihar. There, she was raped repeatedly for weeks. The police rescued her after her grandfather filed a complaint. The perpetrator’s family later pressured Beena to withdraw the case.

Ep30: Michael A. McCoy

Photojournalist and Iraq War veteran Michael A. McCoy drops in the pod to discuss shooting PTSD shooting in civilian life, and his project on black Trump supporters. His work has appeared in Time Magazine, Baltimore Sun, Petapixel, and more.

Ep29: Joseph Rushmore

Joseph Rushmore is a freelance photojournalist currently living in Tulsa, OK. He focuses on breaking news and immersive, in depth stories. He has spent time covering Hurricane Harvey, RNC, DNC, Standing Rock, protests in St. Louis and Tulsa, the opioid crisis, environmental issues and Native sovereignty in Oklahoma, among other stories. He shoots for The Financial Times, Huffington Post, The Tulsa Voice, Sierra Magazine, Tulsa World.