# 75 Peter van Agtmael

This week we talk with Magnum photographer and photobook publisher Peter van Agtmael about his new book Sorry for the War and his 2020 Yearbook. We also discuss issues facing Magnum in the future.

Along with his ongoing personal projects, Van Agtmael has photographed for many leading publications including The New York Times Magazine, where he has had multiple front covers. His work is held at International Center of Photography, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Deutsche Börse, Photography Foundation and Yale University Art Gallery. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the W. Eugene Smith Grant, the ICP Infinity Award for Young Photographer, the Lumix Freelens Award, the Aaron Siskind Grant, a Magnum Foundation Grant as well as awards from World Press Photo, American Photography Annual, POYi, The Pulitzer Center, The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and the FOAM Gallery in Amsterdam.

His book, Sorry for The War is available here.

No. 72 Benjamin Chesterton

We’re back after a long COVID hiatus. We’re kicking off a new season with Benjamin Chesterton, @duckrabbitblog on Twitter, and his open letter to Magnum concerning years of photographing child abuse and other controversies surrounding the iconic photo agency. Trigger Warning: sexual assault, child abuse. This is a harrowing episode. Read his letter to Magnum here. The Statement with over 600 signatures calling on Magnum Photos to demonstrate accountability can be read here.

Since our episode went live, Magnum has released a statement about their archives, “We recognize that we made mistakes and we are deeply sorry for these. In making sensitive work openly available on the internet we haven’t shown enough care for the vulnerable people in the images, and in failing to give the right context to images, we have in some instances misrepresented photographers’ work. Not only has this caused offence to members of the public, it may also have had implications for some of the people shown in the images.” read the rest of the letter here.

Ep 71: Roger May and Photographing Appalachia

Roger May is an Appalachian American photographer and writer based in Charleston, West Virginia. He was born in the Tug River Valley on the West Virginia and Kentucky border, in the heart of Hatfield and McCoy country. His work explores the complicated history of place, faith, and identity in the coalfields. In 2014, he founded the crowdsourced Looking at Appalachia project. He lectures about his work and about the visual representation of Appalachia.

Roger May is an Appalachian American photographer and writer based in Charleston, West Virginia. He was born in the Tug River Valley on the West Virginia and Kentucky border, in the heart of Hatfield and McCoy country. His work explores the complicated history of place, faith, and identity in the coalfields. In 2014, he founded the crowdsourced Looking at Appalachia project. He lectures about his work and about the visual representation of Appalachia.

From the Looking at Appalachia series:

  Ashleigh Coleman . September 11, 2019. Choctaw County, Mississippi.
Ashleigh Coleman. September 11, 2019. Choctaw County, Mississippi.